What Children Around the World Eat for Lunch at School

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What Children Around the World Eat for Lunch at School

Every country has its own standards for school meals. Some schools offer convenience food and snacks for lunch, and some cook set meals for students. The most popular meals are potatoes, rice, and a cabbage salad. There is also milk instead of fruit juice in most of the schools. We found out what school lunches around the world look like.

Asia people Lunch

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Pakistan

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The system of planning school meals in Pakistan is one of the best in the world. Pakistani kinds Many Food Things in School Lunch Box 

Indian

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The system of planning school meals in Indian is one of the best in the world. The two biggest sections of the tray are usually for soup and riceSmaller

Iran


According to law, all children up to 14 years of age can have a cup of milk, pistachios, fresh fruit, and biscuits for lunch at school. But mothers usually prepare a lunchbox for their children: it includes rice, tomatoes, and a lamb kebab.

South Korea


The system of planning school meals in South Korea is one of the best in the world. The two biggest sections of the tray are usually for soup and riceSmaller.  sections are for salads, seafood, veggies, and fruit. Thin children are given fish oil in a measuring spoon. Popular dishes: kimchi, sesame leaves stuffed with rice and covered with honey sauce, pumpkin potato soup, pancakes with green onions, pepper and octopus, and a cucumber and carrot salad.

Japan


Japanese school lunches are almost the same as the South Korean ones: hot soup, rice, poultry or fish, a salad, and milk. Students are not allowed to bring their own food to school until they reach high school. There are no vending machines in the canteens, and students don’t eat in the canteens. They put on white coats and take their lunches to their classrooms, serve at the desks, and eat there.

UK


Fried potatoes, carrots, rice porridge, a salad, fruit, and a Belgian waffle with chocolate. Many schools are limited by budget, and, therefore, students are offered fast food very often. Children love it. And it’s cheap.

USA


This is how school lunch in Utah looks. Peaches, corn, chicken, and soup. Dishes are quite different in American schools. Most of the time it’s fast food and convenience food that children really like: nuggets, French fries, pizza. Parents also give children a lunchbox to take to school.

Turkey


This is a lunch that was prepared at home for the student. Rye bread, walnuts, grapes, apple, pomegranate, and kefir. It’s food that helps to increase brainpower.

Thailand


On today’s menu, there is pork in sweet and sour sauce, rice, and a pudding wrapped in banana leaves.

France


This is a lunch served in a school in the west of France. Fish, spinach, potatoes, cheese, and bread. It’s considered to be the main meal of the day. The lunch break is one to two hours long. Students are also allowed to go home for lunch during this break.

Finland


Finland takes planning school meals very seriously. Every student is offered snacks during the morning and evening classes, as well as lunch. Children eat their lunches in a canteen where they can choose whatever they want from a large variety of dishes. Every school offers a lunch for children with special dietary needs, whether in connection with health issues or religion. The lunch in the picture includes meatballs with sauce, potatoes, salad, and muesli.

Russia


In Russia, students can have free breakfast from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. Lunches after 12 p.m. are paid. But it’s not always clear which meal is breakfast and which one is lunch. For example, this meal includes sausages, buckwheat porridge, and tea.

Hungary


Here, children are offered quite big lunches. Noodle soup, baked beans with chicken, and nuts for dessert.

Israel


Fresh fruit, granola bar, sweets, and flatbread sandwiches.

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